Recent Blog Posts

Don't Want to Take Small Jobs? You Should. Here's How to Do Them While Keeping the Big Projects

Many remodeling companies and custom home builders have a niche. Some companies love the big jobs. Some prefer more modest work. The one thing that most companies don’t like to deal with are the service jobs, the tiny jobs, that good clients call with. If you don’t want to deal with service jobs, then don’t do the meat-and-potato projects. Your clients look to you and your company to provide them with solutions to their problems. The fact is you should be happy they feel that way about your company!

Must-Haves for a Comprehensive Contract

Unless you have someone on staff who can do a Vulcan mind-meld with your customer, odds are you and your potential client will clash about something you thought you had agreed on. When that happens, you’re almost certain to refer to the contract, so the better it is, the greater the likelihood that you’ll avoid problems later. Dennis Dixon, a builder and consultant based in Flagstaff, Ariz.

What to Do With a Worker Who Has A+ Skills but a Failing Attitude

Here’s a situation I hear about from some consulting clients that you might be familiar with. You have an employee who is a high performer. They get a lot of work done. They are highly skilled in often more than one craft. Their only drawback is their attitude. Their manager cannot manage the employee. No other employees want to work with the employee. Why? Because of the employee’s poor attitude. The perfect employee has a good attitude and good craft skills.

Protect Your Jobsite Crews From the Summer Heat

On a jobsite in Kingsville, Texas, in August 2013, a worker was mixing gypsum concrete in preparation for gypcrete installation on an apartment building. It’s not a particularly taxing job, but he was doing it in direct sunlight. “He wasn’t training or doing anything that involved a lot of lifting or climbing,” says Holly Webster, director of administration at Texas-based KWA Construction, which served as the general contractor on the job.

Roof Ventilation

Why ventilate a roof? “The main purpose of roof ventilation is to keep the air space above the roof insulation more or less at the same temperature as the outside air. ”  That’s Sarah Gray, an engineer with RDH Building Science, talking about best practices for venting a roof.

Make Sure to Avoid These Seven Scary Scenarios When Remodeling

Remodeling can be a long, stressful, tiring process, but it doesn’t need to be a dangerous one. You can prevent construction crises with these seven steps. 1. Know your utility lines – Some of the worst catastrophes come about when people mistakenly drill into utility lines. An easy solution to this is calling 811 a few days you before you start working—the operator will notify utility companies who will send you info of any gas, electrical or water lines. 2.